What should I do If My Mastiff Bites Me?

I have a 3-year-old Neopolitan Mastiff named Baxter, and he keeps on biting me! I really don't want to get of Baxter, but I have holes all up and and down my right arm from that dang mutt. Should I take him to an animal trainer, or take away his Beggin' Strips, or what?
I don't want to try biting him back. I really don't want to hurt the thing. He's still basically a puppy.

At three-years-old, he's NOT a puppy. If he's putting actual holes in your arm, I'd recommend putting him to sleep before he seriously injures someone. If he's just pushing you around, you MIGHT be able to train him, but Neos are extremely strong and stubborn.

You may need a professional trainer to help you with this, but let me warn you. Many of the people charging big bucks as "trainers" are not very good and may have no more experience than you do – especially with aggression problems. Ask you local vet for a recommendation. Make sure you check out references from their satisfied customers who had aggressive dogs. Check with the BBB for complaints. Look for a trainer who is a member of the International Association of Canine Professionals web site at www.dogpro.org, which allows you to search for trainers in your state. Their requirements for trainers to join are very stringent. And DON'T send your dog away to be trained. It's a waste of money – you can't build a relationship with a dog that doesn't live with you.

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14 Responses to What should I do If My Mastiff Bites Me?

  1. kateslegacy says:

    With a dog that size, I would highly recommend a trainer. Good luck!
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  2. Queen of the Dachshunds says:

    you should see a trainer to help figure out why he is doing this. if you are irritating him, then you need to stop and the trainier will help you figure out what his triggers are.
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  3. generalmanager says:

    You need to take him to obedience school if you want to keep him or it's just going to get worse and that's not good.
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  4. Dollar 2 97 says:

    Bite him back.
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  5. aussie says:

    do not allow this to happen it is a sign of dominance and aggression. correct him by holding his muzzle shut when he bites you and say in a mean angry tone NO BITE repeat as needed
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  6. lokiluvr says:

    Come on grow a pair,, bite him back!!!!! Actually I did that to our springer, and it worked….
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  7. Karen says:

    My cousins dog was really really bad about biting people, and her mother threatened to have the dog put down if she didn't do something about it. So she took the dog for obedience training and it acts like a completly diff dog, it's so well behaved now!
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  8. chetco says:

    I would recommend getting Wellness or Solid Gold dog kibble.
    Then take away the bowl of food, and keep people food away from his reach.
    Now, this is time consuming, but will really pay off in asserting yourself as the boss in your own home.

    Pour into a bowl what kibble you would normally feed for the day, but put the bowl up.

    Twice per day, sit down and feed him by hand…don't allow him to eat anything that you don't hand to him piece by piece..

    If he acts even a little aggressive, put the food up and try again later..
    Only a few days of feeding him in this manner will really improve his manners…then you can begin putting his food down for him again….but, as soon as there is any aggression…start all over with hand feeding .

    Solid Gold and Wellness are made with dried real meats, so dogs will love it….they will also keep your dog in excellent health.

    Premium kibbles cost a bit more per bag, but less per month, as dogs eat less and waste (poop) less…it will also save in vet bills, especially as they get older.
    References :
    dog breeder since 1968

  9. fishermanswife says:

    I can't believe he bites you; such a docile, loving dog. I'm around several of them in a day. What did you do to him? They are very protective to their humans and very loving, lazy, but must exercise, run. They are very strong. Our's pulled the truck out of gear(neutral) one day while tide to the back on the beach. A truck with a yapping Shiatsu drove by. He took off after it. They hate tiny dogs, cats, and bad people. They love babies. Actually, instead of attacking and biting, shredding, their enemy, they knock them down and hold them there with paw on chest until the master comes….unless you are a tiny dog, cat, or bad person, like I said before. Go to training school with him.
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  10. Atheist_Lovebug says:

    you need to read up on your breed. find out what kinds of things you can do with that breed.
    training ALWAYS helps! and the trainer will be able to help you understand why your dog does the things he does.

    don't get rid of him! most of dog's "bad habits" are actually caused by us humans! we just don't realize this because we don't "speak dog". once you understand HOW your dog thinks you will understand WHY he does bite you.
    i cant begin to guess why he would, because i cant see your actions and how he responds to you leading up to a bite.

    get him to obedience w/ a GOOD trainer that will tell you how your dog thinks, and why he acts the way he does.
    References :
    ASPCA member 10yrs, SPCA & Humane Society volunteer, SPCA foster home volunteer, dog owner *of 4*, foster mom of 3 adults SPCA dogs, and 8 SPCA puppies, i see LOTS of dogs truned in because of "habits" caused by their owners!

  11. tlctreecare says:

    You have chosen a large assertive aggressive bred of dog and it sounds like you do not have alot of experience.
    You need to get one on one help for someone who wroks with large assertive breeds. They can give you tips on how to handle training and teach you how to tech him.
    Also puppies are very mouthy and bite he was not taught as a pup that biting is not going to be tolerated. You will have to teach him that under no circumstances will you the leader and top dog tolerate him biting you ever.
    Get a behavorial trainer and get help or your problems will most likely get worse.
    References :
    I am a dog trainer

  12. hack_ace says:

    This is NOT good. If he is biting you it is likely he'd bite anyone else that gets too close.

    Dogs are pack animals and (s)he has become the alpha dog. This is not good. NEVER NEVER should a pet become the alpha dog. The dog should be below the cat in the range of roles. Otherwise they get aggressive and will cause problems.

    Do you "baby" your dog or are stern with it? You MUST be stern with a dog and make it submit. If it gets rough with you, shove back and hard. (Don't beat it to death or break bones, shove it hard as if it was not your dog and it was attacking you.) This is not your kid or baby. If you've treated this dog as a companion instead of an underling, get professional training (for yourself and the dog).

    A coworker refused to heed this advice from me. Her dog got more and more agressive and started attacking her kids and even visitors. She still "loved" her "baby" but her baby became a bullying brat she could no longer control and it had to be put down. Control your pup now before you have to take drastic measures.
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  13. captobvious52 says:

    Try to discipline him. He probably does it to play with you, and he probably doesn't know that it could possibly hurt you. Don't get him to try to bite you and if he does, tell him no and tap(not hit hard) his nose.
    References :
    Own 3 mastiffs

  14. Dog_trainer says:

    At three-years-old, he's NOT a puppy. If he's putting actual holes in your arm, I'd recommend putting him to sleep before he seriously injures someone. If he's just pushing you around, you MIGHT be able to train him, but Neos are extremely strong and stubborn.

    You may need a professional trainer to help you with this, but let me warn you. Many of the people charging big bucks as "trainers" are not very good and may have no more experience than you do – especially with aggression problems. Ask you local vet for a recommendation. Make sure you check out references from their satisfied customers who had aggressive dogs. Check with the BBB for complaints. Look for a trainer who is a member of the International Association of Canine Professionals web site at http://www.dogpro.org, which allows you to search for trainers in your state. Their requirements for trainers to join are very stringent. And DON'T send your dog away to be trained. It's a waste of money – you can't build a relationship with a dog that doesn't live with you.
    References :
    28 years professional trainer